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Logic Board vs Motherboard: Key Differences You Should Know

If you are confused about Logic board vs Motherboard, then you are not alone. There are many people out there who get confused between these two terms. If you are one of them and wanted to learn about their differences, then you have landed exactly in the right place. If you have been following Computers for art for some time, you would know that I talk about Motherboard a lot here and explain about them in detail. I’ll try to do the same here again for you.

Before we talk about the differences between a Motherboard and a logic board, let’s talk about each of them briefly so that you can understand their differences easily.

What is a Motherboard?

Motherboard (also known as Baseboard, mainboard, or as MOBO in short forms) usually found in numerous types of electronic devices, TVs, Desktop computers, Laptops, Mobile phones, and more. It hosts all the important parts of any device and everything is connected to it. For example, in PC, A Motherboard hosts CPU, GPU, RAM, storage devices such as HDD, SSD, and more. In short, A Motherboard is the heart of any computer. Without a motherboard, there is no computer. I hope you may have got my point.

The sockets in the motherboard are very easy to use. You can upgrade your computer at any point in time using those sockets, though you need to be a little careful while doing that.

Recommended for you: Easy Tips for Cleaning any Motherboard

If you want to learn a little more about Motherboard, here is the relevant video for you.

Video by: PowerCert Animated Videos

What is a Logic Board?

Logic Board is nothing much different from a motherboard. Motherboards used in Apple’s Macintosh computers are simply called “Logic Board” or “Main Logic Board”. It does the same thing as a Motherboard such as hosting integral parts like CPU, RAM, SSD, Graphics Card, etc.

Just like the Retina display which is coined by Apple for their specific display, Apple calls their Motherboard a Logic Board.  The term “Logic Board” was coined by them in the late 1980s and since then it is being called the same term. A general motherboard is manufactured by a lot of popular companies such as Asus, MSI, Gigabyte, Dell, and more but a Logic board is manufactured exclusively by Apple and designed to use for Mac laptops/ PC.

In case of any damage to the logic board in your Mac laptops or PC, you can buy its replacement but is surely going to cost a lot from your pocket.

Okay. Let’s talk about their difference to help you understand a little more.

Logic Board vs Motherboard: Is a Logic Board the same as a Motherboard?

Both Logic Board and Motherboard are very similar to each other. Both of these do the same thing i.e connecting the integral components of the computer. The notable difference between these two terms is one is a generic term and the other one is brand specific. One is manufactured by multiple production companies while the other one is produced by one and only company i.e Apple. I hope this will clear your doubt.

One thing you should keep in mind that Motherboards are also called Logic Board sometimes in some cases. You shouldn’t get confused this term with Apple’s Logic Board.

Recommended: Does your current Motherboard supports UEFI?

Conclusion:

If you are learning recently about Motherboard and you have come across a new term i.e Logic Board, then you may have got confused. Hopefully, you may have got an idea what is the difference between a Logic Board vs Motherboard. If this quick and short post helped you understand the differences, I would request you to share this with your friends who may need to read this. Thank You.

Hi, This is Mohammed Farman and I have been writing about Android, PC, Windows, and more for the last 7 years. I’m passionate about gadgets and I love to share my expertise and opinions with my readers.

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